In Which My Husband Grants my General Conference Wish

  

This weekend was the first weekend in April, which meant Mormons from all over the world gathered together (usually virtually, via the Internet) to listen to messages from our leaders. It involves several hours of talks on religious subjects, as well as beautiful music, and many Mormons have family traditions associated with the two-day semi-annual event. 

On Saturday night, I tweeted in rapid succession: 

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I wish this had happened, but it didn’t. And then a family member (whom I both love and respect) gave both the Klingon and I the impression that she did not feel morally comfortable with one of the choices we may have before us. 

I was feeling pretty down by the end of last night’s final session, and convinced the Klingon to take a walk with me around the lake near our home. Walking is good for the soul, and it makes it easier to talk about difficult things. 

Somewhere along the way, he mentioned that he had been thinking about Eve, in the Garden of Eden, how she must have felt a weight knowing she would be the mother of all living, but she had no children and no idea how to make it happen. We Mormons revere her for making the decision of eating the fruit, affecting the fall, but we don’t often think of the weight she must have carried that must have factored heavily into her decision.

“And then I was thinking about you, Mae. Nobody has tried harder or been more diligent in building our family than you. And if someone told you there was a fruit that would make it so you could have children, you couldn’t get it from them fast enough.

Maybe, he said, maybe infertility was the first challenge ever. 

And just like that, my sweet, stalwart Klingon of a husband provided the healing balm I’d been seeking. I love you, Worf.

Mae

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8 thoughts on “In Which My Husband Grants my General Conference Wish

  1. So brilliant — I had never seen the Eve story from that angle; from that idea of infertility. I think it was good that you tweeted it. That you got that topic off your heart and in front of the eyes of others.

    Like

  2. I think your tweets were awesome. Because of how the way I felt the LDS culture treated the infertile community, I left. I have since found another church I love much more. I’m not saying please look at other options, I’ve learned that God is great no matter which church you attend. I’m just glad you made a statement in your own way. I hope they eventually figure it out.

    Like

    • Thanks! They do such a lackluster job of supporting anyone who doesn’t fit the mold; I hope they figure it out too. I’m glad you’ve found a better place – reading between the lines, it sounds like you went through a lot to find it.

      Like

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